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War Memorials

THE MEMORIAL STONE AT PHILIP & SONS NOSS SHIPYARD

 

FROM THE OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE OF THE UNVEILING OF THE STONE:

"A memorial stone in honour of the twenty workers who died during the World War II bombing of the Philip and Son Shipyard at Noss, near Dartmouth in Devon, is to be put on permanent display on the site and blessed at a special service to be held in November.

 

The shipyard was attacked by German bombers on the 18th September 1942, killing 20 men and women who were building military vessels to assist in the war effort.

 

The initiative by the site owner, Noss Marina Ltd, will see the memorial stone, which has been in storage for more than 5 years, restored and reinstated for permanent public display on the site.  The stone has also now been inscribed with the names of all those that lost their lives.

Former workers at the Phillip and Son Shipyard, as well as the friends and families of those that lost their lives, are being encouraged to attend the memorial service being held on Tuesday 16th November, 11.30am at the former shipyard site.

Amongst those attending the memorial service will be Reg Little from the Kingswear Historical Society and Frank Little who worked at the shipyard.  They lost their brother, George, in the bombing raid.

Reg Little says:  “We are grateful to the management of Noss Marina for their help in restoring and providing a permanent home for the memorial stone for the Noss bombing.

“The survivors of the raid, and families of those that were killed, will warmly welcome the fact that the names of those who died in this local wartime tragedy have been inscribed on the stone as a permanent reminder of their sacrifice.   This memorial service will be a special occasion for all those directly and indirectly associated with Philip & Son boatyard during the wartime years”, he said.

After the service, the stone will be placed in a temporary position on public display for around two years, before it is placed in a permanent position following the completion of the regeneration of the former shipyard site.

Stephen Corner, Chief Executive of Noss Marina said: “We feel strongly about the importance of the heritage of our site and ensuring it is remembered by future generations.

“We therefore wanted to ensure there is a permanent memorial included as part of the development of the site to ensure this tragic day at the Philip and Son shipyard does not get forgotten, and that the 20 workers who lost their lives continue to receive the respect they deserve.”

 

This is a pre-existing stone which has now been fully restored with the names of those who lost their lives now being inscribed on it. It is currently on view at the Noss Marina which is reached from the Kingswear side of the River Dart.

 

THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES ON 18 SEPTEMBER 1942

Frederick Clarence Adams, aged 22

John Richard Ash, aged 21

David Bott, aged 29

Jack George Charles Bustin, aged 52

Rosie Annie Crang, aged 20

Thomas Farr, aged 58

Richard Franklin, aged 26

Lionel Edgar Holden, aged 44

Walter Lewis, aged 40

George Herbert Frank Little, aged 17

Henry James Luckhurst, aged 70

John Martin, aged 48

Ernest Poole, aged 51

Sydney James Alfred Pope, aged 17

Hubert Ernest William Putt, aged 37

Ewart Edgar Trant, aged 27

Nella Eileen Trebilcock, aged 28

Samuel James Veale, aged 21

Frederick Thomas Skinner Vickery, aged 28

Hazel Joan Weaver, aged 20

 

To read a moving account of the day when these lives came to an end, go to

http://www.nossmarina.co.uk/index.php/history/the-bombing-of-noss

 

Philips shipyard at Noss, Dartmouth 2006

The restored Philips shipyard photographed in 2006

This whole area is shortly to be redeveloped

but the Memorial will be retained

© Richard J. Brine

 

 

 

 
 
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