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Devon County

Devonshire Rgt.

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MANATON IN WHITE'S DIRECTORY OF 1850

 

Manaton (or Manadon) is a small village on an eminence, near the rocky hills and the sources of the West Teign or Bovey river, on the eastern side of Dartmoor, 3½ miles SW of Moretonhampstead.  Its parish contains 429 souls and 6393 acres of land, including the hamlets of Freeland and Water, and more than 2000 acres of commons and wastes, amid some to the wildest scenery of Dartmoor Forest.

 

Hountor ( originally in the possession of Sir Hugh Hountor), a stupendous group of rocks, appears like ruined turrets and broken pinnacles, and as seen from different points of view, assumes an endless variety of fantastic figures.

 

The Becky rivulet  flows through a woody dell, where its impetuous stream tumbles over a precipitous bed of large rocks and forms the beautiful cascaded called Becky Falls. The ancient Britains are supposed to have had a town on a spot now called Grimpound and in the neighbourhood are some interesting druidical remains and a few small tin mines.

 

The Earl of Devon owns a great part of the parish and has a rabbit warren of 600 acres here. The rest belongs to the French, Nosworthy, Barham and Bryant families and other freeholders; on the south side of the parish are the Haytor Rocks Granite Works.

 

The church (St Winifred) is a fine old structure in the early perpendicular style with an embattled tower and four bells. It was much injured by lightning on December 13th 1779. The Rectory, valued in the King's Book at £13 12s 8½d and in 1831 at £235, is in the patronage of the Rev. William Carwithen D.D and incumbency of the Rev. W P Wood, who has 40 acres, 1 rod 20 perches of glebe and a good residence, with a large rock behind it, assuming the appearance of a battery, surmounted by a flag staff and commanding beautiful views.

 

The Church House, given by Thomas Southcott in 1597 was rebuilt in 1818 and its rent is carried to the churchwarden's accounts. On Mr Nosworthy's estate is an ancient chapel in the Tudor style, now used as a barn.

 

RESIDENTS

Harvey, Andrew, carpenter

Harvey, John, blacksmith

Hext, Mr Thomas, Cross Park Cottage

Lewis, John, corn miller

Petherbridge, Mr John

Pinsent, Mary Ann, boarding school

Roberts, Thomas, rabbit warrener

Shears, John, Victualler, Half Moon

Shears, William, mason and shopkeeper

Tarr, William, shoemaker

Wood, Rev. William Paul, Rectory

FARMERS

French, John, Houndtor

French, Thomas, Winkson

Harper, William,

Hamlyn, John

Heywar, Thomas

Holman, John

Nosworthy, William

Nosworthy, John

Nosworthy, Robert

Petherbridge, Edward

Petherbridge, William

Smerdon, Richard

Westington, William

White, William

Winsor, William

 

 

 
 
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