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4. BERTRAM WILLES DAYRELL BROOKE

 

Transcription of Panel 4:

Bertram Willes Dayrell Brooke, second surviving son of the Second Rajah, was born in Kuching, Sarawak, in 1876 and granted the title of Tuan Muda* by his father. Like his brother, he was taken to Sarawak during his youth so that he might know and be known by the people. He was educated at Winchester and Trinity College, Cambridge and rowed for the University in 1900 and 1901. He was commissioned in the Royal Horse Artillery and in 1905 was appointed ADC to the Governor of Queensland, Lord Chelmsford.

 

At the beginning of the First World War he was posted with his Regiment to the Middle East and later, as Instructor, to Shoeburyness. On the death of his father in 1917, he resigned from the Army at his brother's request, to help in the Government of their country. Sir Charles had appointed him Heir Presumptive and ordained that no important changes in the State should be made without his consent, that he should administer the Government when the Rajah was absent and that he should preside over the Sarawak Advisory Council in Westminster. These duties he observed with loyalty and deference to his brother, as Rajah,  until the Japanese Occupation, and when administering the country in his brother's absence, arrived at decisions with the same solicitude and wisdom as his forebears. He married Gladys, daughter of Sir Walter Palmer MP by whom he had three daughters and a son, Antoni, the last Rajah Muda**. He died at Weybridge in Surrey on September 15 1965.

*"Little Lord" or heir presumptive.

**Heir Apparent

 

The tombs of the Brooke Rajahs

©Richard J. Brine

The tombs of the Rajahs are in the churchyard, protected from the sheep (and humans) by a stout iron fence. That of  Sir James Brooke is of red Aberdeen granite. That of Sir Charles Anthoni Johnson  is a single slab of Dartmoor granite, which, it is said, took 11 horses to get  into the churchyard. Between them lie the tombs of Sir Charles Vyner de Windt Brooke and Bertram Willes Dayrell Brooke. The ashes of other Brooke relatives lie outside the railings close by.

 

 

 
 
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